Step 4: Change management

One of your major functions is to ensure that the project performs ONLY the work and delivers ONLY the deliverables required and documented in the contract and specifications.

Any deviation from what appear in the scope, service delivery or performance documents is considered change and must be handled using the change control process. The key elements of this process are document and software release management and baseline management.

Depending on the complexity of your project, you should use one of the many available configuration management systems.

No project of even moderate complexity will be planned or executed perfectly.  There is always room for improvement. One method of building continuous improvement into projects is to add the role of the Configuration Control Board or CCB.  Real and potential process, product and performance problems are reported to the CCB for corrective action. The CCB then uses the configuration control process of logging the problem, assigning action and tracking progress in solving these problems.

Change control board (CCB)

Change is inevitable on projects. Customer requirements, funding, and schedules may change.  Rates (labor, overhead, and G&A) may change.  Approaches selected in the proposal phase may not work out. Key personnel may not be available when needed, or not at all.  In these situations, the PM Plan must be changed to reflect the reality of the situation, evaluated against the contract for scope change and coordinated with the customer. While change is necessary, successful projects manage change carefully.  Unnecessary or unaffordable change often leads to disaster.

Configuration and change management process

The following figure illustrates the basic configuration and change management process that should be implemented on your project.

15- ConfigManagementtProcess

– Mike Lisagor

By | 2019-02-21T12:55:13+00:00 November 26th, 2014|post, Project Execution, Monitoring & Control, Uncategorized|0 Comments